Featured Essays


New at Women Rising Radio’s Featured Essays Department!

A TRANSFORMATION OF CONSCIOUSNESS: GOVERNOR NEWSOM RECOGNIZES THE DIGNITY OF UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS

April 15th is a day that the undocumented must dread more than any of us who pay taxes.  Out of their minuscule wages received for long hours of often backbreaking work in farming, food factory labor, domestic labor and caregiving, they must pay taxes to the United States government.

The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy released a report in February 2016, stating that 11 million undocumented workers in the United States are paying annually an estimated amount of $11.64 billion in state and local taxes, “on average an estimated 8 percent of their incomes.”

California’s governor finally  – and miraculously in a nation that largely ignores the poor and marginalized – Governor Newsom finally recognized the undocumented for doing labor that, in the time of Covid-19, is considered to be essential, frontline and indispensable.

Newsom recognized and honored undocumented workers in California  – and by inference in the USA  – on April 15th, normally “tax day”, underlining the irony of the undocumented being forced to support the US government but getting almost no services from that same government.

Said Newsom, “We feel a deep sense of gratitude for people that are in fear of deportation but are still addressing the essential needs of tens of millions of Californians.  And that’s why I’m proud as governor to be the first state to announce a program for direct disaster assistance to those individuals, a total of $125 million.”

The program will assist 150,000 undocumented workers in California with support payments of $500 to $1,000, depending on their circumstances.  Granted there are about a million and a half of these essential workers in California alone, and Newsom is quite aware of that.  But the recognition, the swift action to give relief, and the gratitude expressed by the governor of California are a huge breath of fresh, healthy air.

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NEW SHORT ESSAY ON “JINWAR”,  A DEMOCRATIC WOMEN’S ECO-VILLAGE IN NORTHERN SYRIA, THREATENED BY THE INCURSION OF THE TURKISH MILITARY:

Solidarity with a Kurdish Women’s Eco-village Community in Northern Syria

In early October 2019, when the US administration announced that it was abandoning its Kurdish allies in northern Syria, and  leaving about 1,000 US troops trapped there to face the onslaught of the Turkish military, Women Rising Radio got an alert from a conference in Italy, where Syrian Kurdish women appealed to their supporters worldwide to come to their aid.  They were, and are, directly in the path of the violence in northern Syria, and the  eco-village paradise they created there is also in dire danger.  Women Rising Radio  has featured women working with eco-villages, peace villages, and women’s activist cooperatives across the globe.  We are in solidarity with the women of JINWAR, the feminist and democratic eco-village in northern Syria.   And we want all of our listeners to know about JINWAR.   Perhaps among you there are organizers who can give assistance to this great undertaking  –  helping to protect it.  Here is an excerpt from a letter delivered to the conference in Italy, from the women of JINWAR themselves:

“JINWAR is a place where women are able to live in a communal way and autonomously raise and educate their children freely and without huge daily influence of the dominant male mentality. Many brave women and men fought and gave their lives, in order to liberate this territory and make the possibility to build a new democratic system inspired by the concept of Democratic Confederalism. This system is based on ideas of Abdullah Ocalan concerning women’s freedom and self-administration of different ethnic and social groups, which are living here side by side together. Our village JINWAR is a part and in the same time a result of this revolutionary process. Furthermore, it is also a practical example, how we, as women, can create alternatives in fields as communal living, ecology and economy. During this process many things have been built here in Rojava:  Women are organizing autonomously in every city. Examples for this are “Kongreya Star” and “Mala Jin” (Women’s houses), where women are gathering and developing solutions for problems of the whole society. In the “Mala Jin”  women are supporting each other in solving conflicts in families.   Women’s leadership and participation in decision making processes is also a key component of the direct democracy model being enacted in Rojava. Through that women could gain a new position in society and in politics. This achievement can be an example for all the women in the world.”

The women of JINWAR who drafted this letter go on to describe    the dangers facing them and their visionary enterprise:

”You could see what we have built up: the houses made of clay, in which we live together, the school, the healing center for natural medicine which is supposed to be opened soon, our bakery, the garden, the fields, all the trees, which grow bigger and bigger and all of all our common life, far away from oppression and violence, based upon our will to live together as free women and children.  …All this is now under direct threat by the Turkish State, which openly launches attacks against Northern Syria. Erdogan’s plan is to extinguish the Kurdish people and to occupy our region. We can see the results of this politics in Afrîn, which has  been occupied by Turkey, DAIŞ and other Jihadist groups. The situation in Afrîn turned out really bad for the people, especially for the women,  whose rights were taken away, who suffer from violence and rape, who are sold and treated as slaves. The attacks and another occupation by the Turkish state in other parts of  Northern Syria could mean the same brutal exploitation for  women here.”

The women of JINWAR are calling out to the people of the world to raise our voices and assist them in rescuing all that   can be saved, from the violence of war:

“In the moment we are writing this letter different villages and places around have been bombed and many people have already been killed. Our village, our society, our lives and the life and future of all people here, especially women and children, is under urgent threat.   We, as women and children from JINWAR call you to raise up your voices and take action against this war. Use all the possibilities you have to spread information and raise awareness about the Turkish occupation politics!   Don’t stay silent! Let’s stand up together for free life and for our common future!”

Please send out this plea to all who can be of assistance to the brave and visionary women of JINWAR.


PRO-CHOICE ACTIVIST LAURIE BERTRAM ROBERTS TAKES ON MISSISSIPPI!   BRAVE ACTIVIST.

https://www.thenation.com/article/laurie-roberts-mississippi-abortion-childcare/

Women Rising Radio‘s program on reproductive health here: 


Democrats and Democracy:  Chicago 1968.  

Lynn
by Lynn Feinerman, Producer, Women Rising Radio

A Killer Kulture

As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Democratic National Convention held in Chicago in 1968, the Democratic National Committee is set to hold a significant meeting  –  in Chicago  –  August 24th  and through the weekend, to consider election issues that have been critical for a long time.

That coincidence of time and place evoked in me deep memories of the debacle I witnessed 50 years ago.

April 1968 was “the cruelest month”, in the words of T.S. Eliot, blooming in red, black and blue with the assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,   undisputed king of the civil rights movement, and a hero of mine.

With that spring of 1968 came an offer from my college professor, to join a group of student activists headed to Mississippi for a summer of registering voters of color  – mostly African Americans blocked from exercising rights enshrined for them in the Voting Rights Act.  I wanted to go with that group.

By 1968 I’d been a foot soldier in the nationwide movement against the war in Vietnam for a few years.  I’d helped to swell the ranks of the hundreds of thousands marching in New York and Washington.  I’d participated in a reading of the trendy play MacBird!  with  Smith and Amherst students  –  as a witch chanting “double, double toil and trouble, Burn Baby Burn and Cauldron Bubble…”    I went on to organize teach-ins against the war.

But I hadn’t devoted much time to focusing on civil rights and voting rights.  So I called my parents, who always supported my student political activities both morally and financially.   “I’m going with a Smith group to register voters in Mississippi!”

After an unexpected, stony silence at the other end of the phone conversation, my father finally responded, “Over my dead body.”

“You’re not going there, Lynn,” my mother added.  “You have no idea of the danger involved.”   They pointedly reminded me of the gruesome deaths of three CORE field activists, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman,  and Michael Schwerner just 4 years previously during  “Freedom Summer”  of 1964.

My parents linked forces to demand that I do something else.  When the conversation ended I was, to use a phrase of the time, “hung up”.   I couldn’t go without their financial support, and I clearly had neither that nor their emotional support.

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 “Nuclear is NOT an Option  

by Women Rising Radio Producer Lynn Feinerman

Published in the Tikkun magazine Daily Blog:

http://www.tikkun.org/tikkundaily/2017/04/20/nuclear-is-not-an-option/

Here is the article.  Join the Women’s March to Ban the Bomb:  June 2017

Digging in my tiny Jewish library this Passover season, I came across a short contribution to a published symposium, made by Rabbi Nehemia Polen, a well-known scholar, author and congregational rabbi.

Polen wrote his short piece in 1986, for the literary publication  New Traditions.  But his words were ominously current for me, discovered as if by what we Jews call “hashgachah pratit”,  a kind of destined timeliness.

He was considering the phrase in Jewish prayer liturgy,  “hem yevoshu  ve’yehatu mi’gevuratam”,  translated  “may the nations of the world be put to shame and crushed despite their power.”   He meditated on the meaning of this phrase, and its intention in prayer:

“Then it hit me.  Ever since nuclear weapons entered the world,  with the  potential to destroy not only the victim but the attacker as well, the nations of the world have indeed become terrified of their own power.  A sense of shame does indeed adhere to this power.    The logic of power in history has reached its extreme,  self-negating limit…”

Polen perceives this part of Jewish prayer as “a lengthy meditation on the shamefulness   of power”.   I’ve been considering it throughout this Passover season.   And the world’s so-called leaders  have given me   plenty of evidence corroborating that shamefulness.

This past weekend, as we observed both Passover and Easter worldwide, and likely other holy days not given so much publicity;  as we asked for freedom and commemorated the death of a free-thinking Rabbi,  we watched and listened as Trump and Un of North Korea rattled nuclear sabers at one another, threatening on one side to send “armadas”  –  sailboats from Spain?

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